Are 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th Fixed Sabbaths?
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8th, 15th, 22nd, 29th
The Big Lie
By: Michael Pedrin

 

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Are 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th Fixed Sabbaths?

aare 8th 15th 22nd 29th sabbaths?

The lunar Sabbath issue is basically this: For all months, without exception, the Sabbaths are fixed on the eighth, the fifteenth, the twenty-second, and the twenty-ninth days of the month, as seen in this quotation:

In His calendar, the weekly Sabbath always falls on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th of each month. (Author not given, The WLC Sabbath Challenge; accessed 12–31–13 at http://www.worldslastchance .com/wlc-challenge.html)

World’s Last Chance also states that no one has been able to convincingly, “Demonstrate from the Scriptures that the true seventh-day Sabbath has ever been recorded in the Bible to have fallen on any other dates than those listed above [the eighth, the fifteenth, the twenty-second, and the twenty-ninth]” (Ibid.).

We have proved in the previous chapter—“Three Months in a Row”—that the Sabbaths in all those three months never fell on any of those given dates. Now let us see the other passages of Scripture that they point to as being Sabbaths fixed on the above-given dates.

The Healing of the Blind Man in John 9

The lunar Sabbatarians pick up on the story of the healing of the blind man of John 9 which took place on the Sabbath, according to the gospel account, and claim it happened on the twenty-second of the seventh month. Thus it is another proof for them that the twenty-second is a fixed Sabbath (as well as the eighth, the fifteenth, and the twenty-ninth).

How did they find out that the Sabbath healing of the blind man was on the twenty-second day of the seventh month? Here is what they say:

The last day of the Feast of Tabernacles always falls on the 21st day of the seventh month: (See Leviticus 23:34, 36, 39–41; Numbers 29:12; Deuteronomy 16:13–15; Nehemiah 8:13–18; Ezekiel 45:21–25.)

Christ attended the Feast of Tabernacles. (John 7:10.)

On the last day of the Feast, the 21st of the seventh month, Christ stood and spoke. (John 7:37.)

Christ spent that night on the Mount of Olives. (John 8:1.)

The next morning, the 22nd of the seventh month, Christ returned to the temple. (John 8:2.)

At the temple, Christ healed a blind man. (John 9:6.)

The healing of the blind man caused great anger for it was the seventh-day Sabbath. (John 9:14.)

This places the weekly seventh-day Sabbaths on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th of the month yet again. (Ibid.)

First of all, linking the events that span three chapters (John 7–9) and saying they all happened in two days (the twenty-first and twenty-second of the month) is stretching it too far. Let us check those details carefully to see if they are true.

They are mistaken! The last and great day of the feast is not the twenty-first, but the twenty-second. Though it is called a seven-day feast, it was celebrated for eight days.

Also in the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye have gathered in the fruit of the land, ye shall keep a feast unto the LORD seven days: on the first day shall be a sabbath, and on the eighth day shall be a sabbath. (Leviticus 23:39)

Just like there were special offerings for the first seven days of the feast of tabernacles, there was a special offering on the eighth day, as well.

Seven days ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: on the eighth day shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: it is a solemn assembly; and ye shall do no servile work therein. (Leviticus 23:36)

Did the feast end on the seventh day or the eighth day? Here is a clue right from the Gospel of John:

In the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. (John 7:37)

The last day is called “that great day of the feast.” Was the seventh day of the feast the great day, or was the eighth day of the feast the great day?

Seven days ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: on the eighth day shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: it is a solemn assembly; and ye shall do no servile work therein. (Leviticus 23:36)

Here is further proof that the last great day was not the seventh day of the feast, but the eighth day.

The word for “great” in John 7:37 is megale from the root word megas. John uses this word megale again to talk about the great day of another feast:

The Jews therefore, because it was the preparation, that the bodies should not remain upon the cross on the sabbath day, (for that sabbath day was an high [megale] day,) besought Pilate that their legs might be broken, and that they might be taken away. (John 19:31)

The word for high is megale, and John calls the Sabbath as megale—high or great.

Which day was the Sabbath day in the days of the feast of tabernacles—the seventh or the eighth day?

Also in the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye have gathered in the fruit of the land, ye shall keep a feast unto the LORD seven days: on the first day shall be a sabbath, and on the eighth day shall be a sabbath. (Leviticus 23:39)

There are two Sabbaths in this feast—the first and eighth days. The “last day, that great day of the feast” (John 7:37) is, therefore, the eighth day of the feast.

We see Jesus (and the people) left the temple after the last great day of the feast and according to the lunar Sabbatarians that was the twenty-first. The people never left the temple on the twenty-first because the twenty-second was the climax of that feast. Look at the same feast celebration during Solomon’s time, when the temple was dedicated:

And in the eighth day they made a solemn assembly: for they kept the dedication of the altar seven days, and the feast seven days. And on the three and twentieth day of the seventh month he sent the people away . . . (2 Chronicles 7:9, 10)

The interpretation of the “last day” being the 8th day of the feast is not a private interpretation. This view is also held by several prominent biblical commentators.

Adam Clarke’s Commentary on the Bible:

In the last day, that great day of the feast This was the eighth day, and was called the great day, . . . (Reference for John 7:37; emphasis in original)

Barnes’ Notes on the New Testament:

In the last day. The eighth day of the festival. (Reference for John 7:37)

Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown’s Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible:

The last day, that great day of the feast—the eighth (Le 23:39). (Reference for John 7:37)

Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible:

On the last day of the feast of tabernacles, that great day. The eighth day, which concluded that solemnity, was to be a holy convocation Lev. 23:26. (Reference for John 7:37; emphasis in original)

Having proved that the last and great day of the feast was the eighth day of the feast of tabernacles which is on the twenty-second of the seventh month, we shall now see when the weekly Sabbath arrived.

As stated earlier, according to lunar Sabbatarians the weekly Sabbath when the blind man was healed was the next day after the last and great day of the feast.

So the weekly Sabbath was on the twenty-third of the seventh month when our Lord healed the blind man!

What more proof do they need to show that the Sabbath comes on any other day than the eighth, the fifteenth, the twenty-second, and the twenty-ninth of any month?

The Sabbath in Acts 20

Let us read the Bible passage first:

And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days; where we abode seven days. And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight. (Acts 20:6, 7)

From the above text of Acts 20:6, 7, we come to know that the journey of Paul from Philippi started “after the days of unleavened bread.” They traveled for five days and stayed in Troas for seven days. The seventh day of their stay was the first day of the week.

Now let’s see a lunar Sabbatarian’s interpretation of the passage:

In Luke’s account of their journey, Paul’s company sailed from Philippi after the feast of unleavened bread [which] ended on the 21st of Abib, sailed for five days and arrived at Troas where they stayed seven days. (See Acts 20:5–7.)

The seventh day of their stay at Troas was the second day of the month which Paul refers to as the first day of the week. This again places the Sabbaths on the 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th days of the month. (WLC Sabbath Challenge, Ibid.)

According to page 329 of the book The Acts of the Apostles, the servant of the Lord wrote that they left right after the feast, and so we would agree with the lunar Sabbatarians that they left on the twenty-second, but the twenty-second is a fixed Sabbath for the lunar Sabbatarians! Why would the apostle begin a journey which is only five days long on the Sabbath? This again proves that the twenty-second wasn’t a fixed Sabbath at all!

But let us assume that the lunar Sabbatarians do not accept the statement of Ellen White or that he started a day later because the twenty-second is a fixed Sabbath for them. Let us put Paul’s journey starting one day later, for that way Paul’s travel of five days starts and ends during the days of the week and not on the Sabbath.

So let’s say they started on the twenty-third and traveled for five days. The dates of travel would have been the twenty-third, the twenty-fourth, the twenty-fifth, the twenty-sixth, and the twenty-seventh.

They would have arrived at Troas on the twenty-seventh of the first month. For seven days they stayed there, and the seventh day of their stay at Troas was the first day of the week, according to the biblical record.

Let us count the seven days’ stay at Troas—the twenty-seventh, the twenty-eighth, the twenty-ninth, the thirtieth, the first, the second, and the third.

If the third of the second month was the “first day of the week,” then you don’t get a Sabbath on the eighth! (The eighth, the fifteenth, the twenty-second, and the twenty-ninth days are fixed Sabbaths for them.)

They can hold onto only one of two positions—a) If Paul began his five days’ journey on the twenty-second, then the twenty-second was not a Sabbath because Paul regarded the twenty-second as a common day for long-distance travel. b) If Paul began his journey on the twenty-third, a day after the Sabbath, then the lunar Sabbatarians can’t arrive at having the eighth as a fixed Sabbath, but it should be the 9th.

You see again you don’t have a fixed Sabbath appearing on the eighth, the fifteenth, the twenty-second, and the twenty-ninth for both the months in succession!

The Sabbath in Esther 9

The lunar Sabbatarians say that in Esther 9 the Sabbath is confirmed again to be on the fifteenth of the twelfth month:

The 15th of the 12th month was a rest day, making the 8th, 22nd and 29th rest days as well. (Esther 9.) (Ibid.)

The word Sabbath is not mentioned in Esther chapter 9. Only the word rested appears three times in that chapter.

Even though Sabbath is a day of rest, it does not mean that wherever the word rest appears it is a reference to the weekly Sabbath rest. Consider this text:

And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat. (Genesis 8:4)

The word rested is the same Hebrew root word used in Esther chapter 9, and the word is nuwach. The word commonly used to designate the Sabbath rest, however, is shabath.

The ark rested on the seventeenth day of the month. So is the seventeenth, therefore, the Sabbath? They would have said so, if the ark had rested on the fifteenth!

What does the passage of Esther say? It had nothing to do about the day of worship, but was a victory celebration. Their enemies had been destroyed.

On the thirteenth day of the month Adar; and on the fourteenth day of the same rested they, and made it a day of feasting and gladness. But the Jews that were at Shushan assembled together on the thirteenth day thereof, and on the fourteenth thereof; and on the fifteenth day of the same they rested, and made it a day of feasting and gladness. (Esther 9:17, 18)

How can the lunar Sabbatarians say that only the fifteenth was a day of rest? It says the thirteenth, the fourteenth, and fifteenth were all rest days. So do we conclude that there are three Sabbaths occurring on three consecutive days?

Even here we see they are flawed in their basic interpretation of scripture.

The Sabbath at the Time of Solomon

The lunar Sabbatarians quote the passage of the dedication of the Solomon’s temple to prove that the Sabbath was fixed on the twenty-second of that month.

Solomon kept the Feast of Tabernacles for seven days. On the 8th day (22nd of the month) they made a solemn assembly. Solomon sent the people away on the 23rd, being careful not to send them away on the 22nd, the Sabbath. (See 2 Chronicles 7:8–10). This places the Sabbath for the seventh month on 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th. (WLC Sabbath Challenge, Ibid.)

They admit that it was the Feast of Tabernacles. The twenty-second was always a yearly Sabbath in the Feast of Tabernacles. They were to make offerings for seven days, and the eighth day was a sacred high day, a special day—it was part of the feast and not outside the feast celebration.

Seven days ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: on the eighth day shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: it is a solemn assembly; and ye shall do no servile work therein. (Leviticus 23:36)

It is interesting to note that when God forbade work on the weekly Sabbath, He said “but the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work” (Exodus 20:10), but when God forbade work on the yearly Sabbaths (except the Day of Atonement), He used an additional word—“servile work” (Leviticus 23:36).

It shows that the twenty-second was not a fixed weekly Sabbath, but a fixed yearly Sabbath where “servile work” was forbidden.

Let’s look at the passage in consideration.

Also at the same time Solomon kept the feast seven days, and all Israel with him, a very great congregation, from the entering in of Hamath unto the river of Egypt. And in the eighth day they made a solemn assembly: for they kept the dedication of the altar seven days, and the feast seven days. And on the three and twentieth day of the seventh month he sent the people away into their tents, glad and merry in heart for the goodness that the LORD had shewed unto David, and to Solomon, and to Israel his people. (2 Chronicles 7:8–10)

The lunar Sabbatarians say “Solomon sent the people away on the 23rd, being careful not to send them away on the 22nd, the Sabbath. (See 2 Chronicles 7:8–10)” (WLC Sabbath Challenge, Ibid.). Was it because the twenty-second was a fixed weekly Sabbath that he didn’t send them away on that day? No. The twenty-second was a fixed yearly Sabbath!

So you see that the lunar Sabbatarians’ interpretation of this text is deceptive.

The Sabbath during the Dedication of Priesthood

This is what the lunar Sabbatarians say about the dedication of Aaron to the office of the priesthood:

Dedication of Priesthood:

Aaron and his sons were sanctified for seven days beginning on New Moon Day (See Exodus 40: 2, 17). On the eighth day (which was also the 8th of the month), there was an assembly of the congregation. During the preceding seven days, they [Aaron and his sons, not the congregation] were not to leave the tabernacle. (See Leviticus 8:1–13; 33–35; 9:1–5). From Exodus 40:17 we learn that it was the first month (Abib) of the second year after their departure from Egypt, in which Passover was to be kept; this is a double confirmation that the Sabbaths for this month fell on 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th. (WLC Sabbath Challenge, Ibid.)

Let us see what the Bible says about these events: The tabernacle was to be erected and dedicated (Exodus 40:2, 9; Leviticus 8:10, 11), the priests were to be anointed (Exodus 40:13, 15; Leviticus 8:12), the congregation was to be gathered (Leviticus 8:3); and, yes, the Bible says Aaron and his sons were sanctified for seven days (Exodus 29:35; Leviticus 8:33, 35), but let us notice what the Bible says about these events.

If you read Exodus 40, you find a flow of events without a stopping point or a place where there is a shift in the time sequence of events. “On the first day of the first month shalt thou set up the tabernacle of the tent of the congregation” (Exodus 40:2). All the events that are listed from verse 3 until at least verse 33 happened without any noticeable break in time. This includes the erection of the tabernacle, the anointing of the tabernacle, and the washing and anointing of the priests. In Leviticus 8 we find the additional information that the congregation was to be gathered, but this was before the consecration began. This consecration appears to have begun on the same day the tabernacle was erected. Even if it were the next day, the gathering would have been on the second day of the month and not on the eighth day. For seven days, offerings of dedication were made for the altar (Exodus 29:37), and for seven days the priests were to abide at the tabernacle.

The lunar Sabbatarians are trying to establish the eighth day as a public gathering to prove that it was a Sabbath. This is their assignment of dates and not the Bible’s. Even if Aaron was dedicated on the eighth that would not prove it was the Sabbath! That is reading something into the text.

Again you see these teachings are misleading in their interpretation of scriptures. There are no Sabbaths fixed at the time of the anointing of the priesthood.

The Sabbath during Hezekiah’s Reform

The lunar Sabbatarians use the passage of 2 Chronicles 29 to prove that the Sabbaths are fixed as they claim they are:

Hezekiah’s Reform:

The people began to sanctify on New Moon day of the first month and on the 8th of the month they went to the temple. On the 16th of the month, they “made an end” which was the first day of the work week. (2 Chronicles 29:17.) (WLC Sabbath Challenge, Ibid.)

What is the background of King Hezekiah’s reform? For a long time the temple had been shut, and there had been no service:

Also they have shut up the doors of the porch, and put out the lamps, and have not burned incense nor offered burnt offerings in the holy place unto the God of Israel. (2 Chronicles 29:7)

The house of God was damaged, and Hezekiah ordered it repaired:

He in the first year of his reign, in the first month, opened the doors of the house of the LORD, and repaired them. (2 Chronicles 29:3)

It was all so messy, and it required a real cleaning:

And said unto them, Hear me, ye Levites, sanctify now yourselves, and sanctify the house of the LORD God of your fathers, and carry forth the filthiness out of the holy place. (2 Chronicles 29:5)

It took sixteen days to physically repair, clean, wash, and set the temple in order.

Please remember when Moses was building the temple that God clearly instructed the people not to do any physical work in building His house on the Sabbath. God told them to do it only on the six working days of the week:

Six days shall work be done, but on the seventh day there shall be to you an holy day, a sabbath of rest to the LORD: whosoever doeth work therein shall be put to death. (Exodus 35:2)

King Hezekiah was a godly man. He strictly followed the word of God. “And he did that which was right in the sight of the LORD” (2 Chronicles 29:2).

Notice that on the eighth day they were working:

Now they began on the first day of the first month to sanctify, and on the eighth day of the month came they to the porch of the LORD: so they sanctified the house of the LORD in eight days; and in the sixteenth day of the first month they made an end. (2 Chronicles 29:17)

Based upon this text, we cannot determine that the eighth day was a Sabbath. The Bible says that the sanctification of the temple took eight days. During this time there would have been dirt and dust to clean. There may have even been idols to remove from the temple, although we are not distinctly told of this. We are not told if there was a break for any Sabbath during this time, but there must have been; however, the Bible does not say on which day. It does not say the eighth day neither does it give the eighth day preeminence above any other day, except that the Bible lists this day as the ending point of this process. It is even less likely this was the Sabbath because it was the ending point of the sanctifying process and, therefore, was probably a day of work to finish the project. Since there is no proof that the eighth was a Sabbath, we cannot speculate or assume that the fifteenth, the twenty-second, and the twenty-ninth days of the month were also Sabbaths.

The Ceasing of the Manna

God miraculously provided manna for His people for forty years. After they entered the land of promise, God stopped the giving of manna. Let us see when God stopped it:

And the children of Israel encamped in Gilgal, and kept the passover on the fourteenth day of the month at even in the plains of Jericho. And they did eat of the old corn of the land on the morrow after the passover, unleavened cakes, and parched corn in the selfsame day. And the manna ceased on the morrow after they had eaten of the old corn of the land; neither had the children of Israel manna any more; but they did eat of the fruit of the land of Canaan that year. (Joshua 5:10–12)

The Passover is the fourteenth day of the first month. The next day (the fifteenth) they ate unleavened cakes and parched (roasted) corn. And the manna ceased on the sixteenth, the day after they ate the corn of the land.

So we have three days mentioned in the passage of scripture—the fourteenth, the fifteenth and the sixteenth.

The days of the week are not mentioned in the passage. Only the dates of the month are known from the passage of scripture.

And the manna ceased on the morrow after they had eaten of the old corn of the land . . . (Joshua 5:12)

It doesn’t say the manna ceased from the sixteenth, but the manna ceased on the sixteenth. It means it did not come on the sixteenth.

The Septuagint version says:

In this day the manna failed, after they had eaten of the corn of the land.

If the manna stopped coming on the sixteenth, it means the last day of its coming was the fifteenth!

Now the fifteenth is a Sabbath for the lunar Sabbatarians, so they won’t like to agree that it came on the fifteenth. If it came on the fifteenth, it means the fifteenth was not a Sabbath that month because God never gave manna on the Sabbath.

Now on which day did God always stop sending manna week after week for forty years? The Sabbath day!

There is linguistic evidence to support the concept that the final time that God stopped sending the manna was also on the Sabbath day, and that day was the sixteenth, not the fifteenth.

And the manna ceased on the morrow after they had eaten of the old corn of the land; neither had the children of Israel manna any more; but they did eat of the fruit of the land of Canaan that year. (Joshua 5:12)

The word ceased is shabath in the Hebrew text, the root word from which Sabbath is derived. The manna Sabbath-ed on the sixteenth because that was the day of the Sabbath. On the Sabbath it always ceased, week after week, and according to the language, there is evidence that the final time it ceased was on the same day of the week that it had ceased for forty years.

So this text is clear beyond any doubt that the manna fell on the fifteenth, a day on which it would never have fallen if it had been the Sabbath, and the language of the text indicates that the day that the manna ceased was the Sabbath.

The luni-solar calendar stands flawed again!

Apostle Paul Settles the Challenge

We are the spiritual Laodicean Church of the last days (Revelation 3:14–21). The conflict of whether the weekly Sabbaths are to be counted by the phases of the moon seems to be shaking the foundation of many precious souls.

Was the new moon to be observed at all in the post-Calvary period?

Just as some of the spiritual Laodiceans of the last days are confronted with this, the literal Laodiceans of the early days faced this issue, as well.

For I would that ye knew what great conflict I have for you, and for them at Laodicea . . . (Colossians 2:1)

In the clearest language the apostle settles the challenge:

Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross . . . Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days: Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ. (Colossians 2:14, 16, 17)

“The new moon” religious observance is called a “shadow” of the cross. All the shadows of the cross have been nailed to the cross.

The word judge in verse 16 is the word krineto, from the root word krino, meaning to condemn. A version of this same root word is used in John 3:18: “He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already.”

There was a group of people within the church who were condemning others for not observing the new moon and festivals based on the new moon.

The apostle makes it clear that they stood in no condemnation indeed because it was all nailed to the cross! 

The only day that God has asked us to remember is the seventh-day Sabbath which is a part of the eternal law of God and which is not a shadow of anything. If the weekly Sabbath is to be reckoned by the phases of the moon, then the apostle is breaking the very foundation and yardstick of the Sabbath observance!

No! The weekly Sabbath is independent of the new moon; therefore, the new moon observation is nailed to the cross while the Sabbath still remains in the Christian era.

As some early Christians rejected the word of God from the apostle to them, this is being repeated again.

Ye observe days, and months, and times, and years. I am afraid of you, lest I have bestowed upon you labour in vain. (Galatians 4:10, 11)

The lunar Sabbath observers know that the word month comes from the word moon, yet they “observe” the moon still, in spite of the counsel from the Lord!

In Conclusion

As the pagans say without the sun there can be no life, the lunar Sabbatarians say without the moon there can be no time measured. But our God is not dependent upon them; everything depends upon Him!

The seventh-day Sabbath is a memorial of God’s creatorship—that He made all things from nothing, but the lunar Sabbatarians have made the Sabbath as a memorial to the moon, by placing the moon ahead of God’s first day of creation!

This is the precise reason why God generated life and began time calculation before creating the sun and the moon!

Finally, when the Creator of all things, including the sun and the moon, judges the world, those who gave emphasis to things created rather than to the Creator, will be damned.

And they shall spread them before the sun, and the moon, and all the host of heaven, whom they have loved, and whom they have served, and after whom they have walked, and whom they have sought, and whom they have worshipped: they shall not be gathered, nor be buried; they shall be for dung upon the face of the earth. (Jeremiah 8:2)

Yes, before the Sunday Sabbath law (the spurious Sabbath) scorches and tries God’s remnant people, this Moonday Sabbath (the fictitious Sabbath) is making rounds.

Our prayers and deepest concerns are for the ones who are being deceived. May they see the light again and return to worshipping the true God on the true seventh-day Saturday Sabbath!



 


 

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Pastor Michael Pedrin Preaching